NEW   USED   PARTS   ORDERING   PAYMENT   SHIPPING   WARRANTY   RETURNS

TECH   RESOURCES   GALLERY   WANTED   LINKS   NEWS   EBAY   FAKES

HOME   NAMM   FEEDBACK   TESTIMONIALS   CONTACT   EMAIL

 

 


Breaking Strings

Strings will usually break at the bridge on any guitar. On a trem equipped guitar they will break much more often than on a fixed bridge, and on a floating bridge where you can also pull up the notes the strings will break even faster. This is perfectly normal and is due to metal fatigue. Anytime you bend a string it causes fatigue to the metal and cumulatively will age the string rapidly. Take any piece of metal and bend it enough times and it will break, it's metallurgy and you're not going to change it. The longer you leave your strings on the closer they are to breaking. The harder you play the faster they will break. The more you use the whammy bar the faster you accelerate the fatigue.

You can also break strings with bad picking technique, or by over-bending fatigued strings. Every time I broke a string I'd know instantly why it broke. Either I picked too hard, too hard for the amount I bent the string, too hard for how old the strings were, or I'd catch the string on the edge of my pick, or whammy'd too much within a combination of the above.

The usual finger pointing is to a burr in the saddle but in all the years of working on guitars I've only truly seen one or two burr's I could contribute any blame to breaking strings, the rest were all simple metal fatigue or "user error" for the amount of fatigue in the strings being used.

The cure? CHANGE YOUR STRINGS MORE OFTEN!! It ain't rocket science. When they get old, change them!

The new Edge Pro bridges have been attributed to faster fatigue to the strings due to the hardened steel saddle inserts. Theoretically sound and quite possible, but the cure is still the same, change strings more often!! ;o}


Copyright 2000 Ibanez Rules!! All rights reserved.
Revised: June 24, 2009.